DOWNLOADS

Since The Colonial Present, my writings on late modern war – in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Iraq and elsewhere – have been widely scattered, and not always readily accessible.  I’m bringing many of them together in my next book, The everywhere war, for which they will all be extensively revised and updated; I’ll post some notes on the updates and explain how they fit into the book  in due course.  But in the meantime here are some of the original versions — please note that in most cases these are the manuscript versions; the published versions are usually shorter (!) — more to come:

GREGORY The Biopolitics of Baghdad FULL copy  ‘The biopolitics of Baghdad: counterinsurgency and the counter-city’ [original in Human Geography 1 (2008) 6-27]

GREGORY Rush to the intimate FULL  ‘The rush to the intimate: counterinsurgency and the cultural turn in late modern war’  [original in Radical Philosophy 150 (2008) 8-23]

GREGOR Seeing Red Baghdad and the event-ful city ‘Seeing Red: Baghdad and the event-ful city’ [original in Political Geography 29 (2010) 266-79]

GREGORY From a View to a Kill TCS  ‘From a view to a kill: drones and late modern war’ [original in Theory, culture and society 28 (2011) 188-215]

The published version of ‘The everywhere war’ – the article not the book – has been re-published in a collated ‘virtual issue’ and is open access (for a limited period) here.

I brought some of these arguments together in a preliminary way for a conference on “Orientalism and War”, held at the University of Oxford in 2010; here is both the (longer) conference version, ‘Dis/Ordering the Orient: scopic regimes and modern war’, and the version that will appear in Orientalism and War, edited by Tarak Barkawi and Keith Stanski (London: Hurst; Ithaca; Cornell University Press, 2012):

GREGORY DisOrdering the Orient CONFERENCE VERSION

GREGORY DisOrdering the Orient BOOK VERSION

I’ve also written several essays on the global war prison, especially Guantanamo, and will revise this for the book – to include a full(er) discussion of Bagram and other sites:

GREGORY The Black Flag Guantanamo and the space of exception ‘The Black Flag: Guantánamo and the space of exception’, Geografiska Annaler  88 B (2006) 405-27

GREGORY Vanishing points FINAL ‘Vanishing points: law, violence and exception in the global war prison’ [ch. 11 of Derek Gregory and Allan Pred (eds) Violent geographies: fear, terror and political violence (New York: Routledge, 2007) pp. 205-236

GREGORY Vanishing points ILLUSTRATED Illustrated manuscript version

Here is an essay on the idea of the 'Middle East', which was published in a book of essays/catalogue to accompany an exhibition, Safar/Voyage: Contemporary works by Arab, Iranian and Turkish artists, at the wonderful Museum of Anthropology at UBC , April-September 2013:

GREGORY Middle East#1

That essay ends with the Arab uprisings, and I've provided a discussion of the role of Tahrir Square in Cairo, forthcoming in Middle East Critique, here:

GREGORY Tahrir

My interest in the histories and geographies of bombing started here:

GREGORY 'In another time zone'_illustrated [the published version, '"In another time-zone the bombs fall unsafely": targets, civilians and late modern war',  appeared in Arab World Geographer 9 (2) (2006) 88-111 [published in 2007]]

GREGORY Death of the civilian [published in Environment & Planning D: Society & Space 24 (2006) 633-38]

This resulted in my current research project, Killing space, and here are two essays that explain some of its parameters (the original SSHRC grant application is here: KILLING SPACE):

GREGORY Doors into nowhere PUBLISHED VERSION 2011 copy  ‘“Doors into nowhere”: Dead cities and the natural history of destruction’, in Peter Meusburger, Michael Heffernan, Edgar Wunder (eds.), Cultural memories (Heidelberg: Springer, 2011) 249-81.

GREGORY Lines of descent openDEMOCRACY version  ‘Lines of descent’, in Peter Adey, Mark Whitehead and Alison Williams (eds) From above: the politics and practice of the view from the skies (London: Hurst; Ithaca: Cornell University Press) (in press).

Here is the updated version of a general essay on drones, ‘Moving targets and violent geographies’, which will appear in a volume of essays dedicated to the memory of Allan Pred; a still longer version will appear in The everywhere war, so I’d welcome any comments (preferably by e-mail):

DEREK GREGORY Moving targets and violent geographies FINAL

My work on bombing intersects with a wider interest in ‘war at a distance’; I’ve started to explore this in my presentations under the general title “Deadly Embrace”, and here is a revised (but still highly compressed) version of part of the argument as delivered to the IGC in Cologne in August 2012:

GREGORY Deadly Embrace IGC Keynote 2012

Here are the slides for the first (and still preliminary) version of Gabriel’s map:

GREGORY Gabriel’s map SHORT

And here is the essay version of Gabriel’s map: cartography and choreography in modern war:

GREGORY Gabriel’s map FINAL CHAPTER

Here is my (still very preliminary) proposal for Medical-military machines and casualties of war 1914-2014:

GREGORY Medical-military machines PUBLIC

And finally – and largely outside the scope of any of these – here is the introductory essay I co-wrote with Noel Castree for Human geography (Sage, 2012):

GREGORY and CASTREE Human Geography introduction

Please let me know if any of these links don’t work; and I’d welcome any comments or suggestions (especially as I’ll be revising and updating several of these essays for the book)

6 comments on “DOWNLOADS

  1. Pingback: GEOINT 2012 reflections on the Intelligence Community | Open Geography

  2. Pingback: Essay: The Historical Rise of the Predator Drone | Understanding Empire

  3. Pingback: Deadly Embrace: the sawn-off version | Paulo Jorge Vieira

  4. Pingback: Tahrir Squared | For Another Critique of the Pyramid

  5. the whole & its parts, so well addressed by Gregory & his selected commentaries from other scholars / critical observers, challenges us all to consider, in both quantitative & qualitative terms, the range of scales: spatial / strategic / intensity involved, perhaps including a center-periphery approach to assess potential for spatial spread & rapidity of that spread. This would also focus on cultural geographies, as the region still operates as segmented social systems & microgeographies count in relation to affinity networks. A Blackbox labeled Alevi, for example, generalizes complexity. Most of us with hands-on experience & historical expertise realize such complexities & are often baffled by the ignorance of policy makers in quasi-hegemonic states laden with academic experts. But in short, global resistance to the war machine requires more precise knowledge at each scale surrounding a particular conflict locus — an online invitational discussion group focused on specific conflict locii & experts on that, would be welcome & informative for a larger circle of interest.

  6. Pingback: Grégoire Chamayou: bodies, manhunts and drones

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